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Not so fast? Noted attorney predicts Brady will play all of 2016

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Posted at 2:06 PM, Jul 14, 2016
and last updated 2016-07-14 14:15:47-04

With Wednesday's decision from the U.S. Second Circuit Court of Appeals, it made it look more and more likely that New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady would have to serve his four-game suspension at the beginning of the 2016 season.

With only one last course of action left, Brady is expected, as reported by many different accounts, to request an appeal hearing with the U.S. Supreme Court. Some see it as the last hurrah, but at least one notable attorney seems to think Brady will get his wish and be able to play in 2016.

Alan Milstein, who previously litigated against the NFL, wrote in his Sports Law blog today that he predicts Brady will be able to play the entire season, which for Bills fans, means he would be available in that Week Four contest on October 2.

"Now that the Second Circuit has denied the Petition for Rehearing filed by the NFLPA and Brady, the only recourse is a Petition for Certiorari to the Supreme Court. But since the season starts September 8th, the case would be moot if Brady has to serve his four game suspension. The obvious next play is to ask the Court for a stay pending this Hail Mary pass for one last hearing. The Court, however, is in recess, so the Petition for Stay goes to the Justice assigned to the Second Circuit, none other than [Justice Ruth Ginsburg]..."

With that logic, and the timeliness of it all, Milstein believes that Brady will be issued the stay by Justice Ginsburg and will play the entirety of the 2016 season. That would delay the suspension into the 2017 season, and in turn, make him available for the game against the Buffalo Bills in Week Four of the 2016 season.

That is one man's educated guess as to what will happen. So, what's next?

Brady and his legal team must decide what their next course of action is, and if they'll go through with taking it all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court.

It ain't over 'til it's over, it would seem.

Twitter: @JoeBuscaglia