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Can Governor Cuomo overcome scandals surrounding his office?

Posted at 6:24 PM, Mar 01, 2021
and last updated 2021-03-01 18:24:35-05

“Let's be honest with ourselves, we look to see what happens at a car wreck when we go by on the highway, and this is the political equivalent of that,” explained U.B. Political Science Associate Professor, Jacob Neigheisel.

As a second scandal in as many months swirls around Governor Andrew Cuomo, so too does the intrigue of what will happen next according Neiheisel. “Anything taken in isolation might be ignored or might only occupy a news cycle or two. It’s something that has snowballed into a real problem for the office.”

Cuomo is facing a federal probe into his handling of COVID-19 in nursing homes statewide, and now a special prosecutor will investigate two sexual harassment allegations from two former aides.

The governor’s office relinquished full control of the process Monday afternoon to the New York Attorney General in an official referral letter.

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REPORTER Ali Touhey: Are these things that you think the governor can overcome?
NEIHEISEL: I think he can in a state like NY. It’s not clear without a resignation how it would unfold in terms of getting rid of him.

There are no indications Cuomo is considering resigning.

In a statement, he did apologize for some of his behavior related to the sexual harassment claims.

“At work sometimes I think I am being playful and make jokes that I think are funny. I do, on occasion, tease people in what I think is a good natured way. I acknowledge some of the things I have said have been misinterpreted as an unwanted flirtation. To the extent anyone felt that way, I am truly sorry about that," the statement said.

Buffalo based Attorney Lindy Korn specializes in discrimination in the workplace. She said if the accusations are found to be true, the apology doesn’t go far enough. “To say I was only teasing or I didn’t mean it, those are good words. However, it is not what the harasser thinks that matters. It is what the alleged victim heard and felt,” she explained.