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What happens now following Capitol riots?

Numerous questions consume Washington
Posted at 9:55 PM, Jan 07, 2021
and last updated 2021-01-07 21:55:44-05

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Following the once unthinkable scene at the United States Capitol Wednesday, a number of questions are on the minds of Americans regarding what happens next in American politics.

INAUGURATION

The riot happened just 14 days before President-elect Biden's inaugural ceremony on the West steps of the Capitol. Outside the Capitol a new, large fence was being constructed in preparation of the next big event: the inauguration.

National Guardsmen sat on buses Thursday as they waited for orders and instructions.

Kevin, a Trump supporter who did not participate in the D.C. riots, said near the Capitol what many Americans were thinking.

"I think it’s pretty funny the fences are going up now. That’s what we talked about last night I think they knew this was going to happen," Kevin, a New Jersey resident, said.

Democrats in Congress have called for various top security officials to resign over the wake of the security failure.

While President Joe Biden's inauguration is expected to go on as planned, additional security measures are being talked about and already implemented.

25th Amendment

The 25th Amendment removes the president from office if the majority of the cabinet agrees to it, as well as the vice president.

Vice President Pence would then assume the duties of the president.

Multiple reports suggest that has been suggested within the highest levels of Republican leadership.

However, no signs point to the 25th amendment being used Thursday with cabinet secretaries resigning instead.

"The reason the 25th Amendment came about, was that after the Kennedy assassination there had been concerns if Kennedy had lived for a time," Professor John White, a professor of politics at Catholic University, said.

UNITY POTENTIAL?

After the events at the Capitol Wednesday, a rare moment of bipartisanship occurred with the Electoral College certification process not being as contentious as originally thought.

Could this create a unique moment for Republicans and Democrats to come together and pass some bipartisan bills like economic aid or immigration reform?

"I think there is an opportunity. The lawmakers themselves who had to take cover realize this is an inflection point," White said.