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VIDEO: 5-year-old boy with brain condition inspires many with first solo steps

Doctors told family he would likely never walk independently
VIDEO: 5-year-old boy with brain condition inspires many with first solo steps
Posted at 11:51 AM, Jun 19, 2020
and last updated 2020-06-19 12:30:31-04

WOODSTOCK, Ga. – A 5-year-old boy with a brain condition took his first independent steps last weekend and a video of the precious moment is inspiring people across the globe.

Camden Hanson’s mother, Mandy, tweeted the clip Saturday, “since we all could use a little happiness in our lives these days.” As of Friday morning, the video had garnered nearly 8 million views and more than 420,000 likes.

Mandy says Camden has progressive cerebellar atrophy and is physically handicapped. When her son’s cerebellum doesn’t function properly, Mandy says daily tasks like forming words and balancing can be challenging.

Mandy told the Today Show that doctors and therapists told her family that Camden would likely never walk independently. However, thanks to 10 therapy sessions a week, the little boy was able to prove them wrong with the walk through his living room in Woodstock, Georgia.

Along with walking, speaking has also been a challenge for Camden. But with intensive therapy and a strong-willed attitude, Mandy says he has improved from using sounds to communicate to speaking in full sentences.

Sadly, Mandy told Today that her son’s atrophy is getting worse and doctors haven’t been able to pinpoint a gene causing his condition. So, Mandy says Camden has joined the Undiagnosed Disease Network, a research study that works to provide families with more information about mysterious health conditions.

This fall, Mandy says her son will start kindergarten in an inclusive classroom and the family hopes he’ll be comfortable with perhaps using only one crutch.

Mandy says she never expected the video of Camden’s special moment to go viral, but she hopes the clip spreads awareness for her son’s rare genetic disease.