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Poll reveals less than half of NY parents satisfied with remote learning

Survey: Teens think remote learning is 'worse', worried about future opportunities
Posted at 11:12 AM, Oct 28, 2020
and last updated 2020-10-28 11:12:08-04

NEW YORK (WKBW) — A poll released by The Education Trust–New York revealed less than half of New York parents with children participating in remote learning say it has been successful.

More specifically, the poll revealed significant concerns among parents from low-income backgrounds and parents of color about the quality of remote learning.

The Education Trust–New York partnered with Global Strategy Group to conduct the online poll (desktop and mobile) which surveyed 800 parents of children in New York State public schools from October 16 to October 21 with a confidence interval of +/-3.5%.

Below you can find some of the key findings of the poll according to The Education Trust-New York:

  • Overall support for schools’ handling of the pandemic. Parents of color (71%), parents from low-income households (63%), and parents of fully remote learners (65%) are less likely to rate their schools’ handling of the coronavirus as positive, compared to White parents (79%), more affluent parents (90%), and parents of in-person/hybrid learners (82%).
  • Dissatisfaction with remote learning. There is low satisfaction with remote learning overall and among parents of color. Only 39% of parents rate remote learning as successful (ratings of 8-10 on a 0-10 scale, an additional 18% of parents say their child is not participating in remote learning right now) – meaning less than half (48%) of parents whose children have been participating in remote or distance learning so far this fall rate it as successful. These low satisfaction ratings are largely driven by parents from low-income households and parents of color – especially Latinx parents. While 68% of parents rate remote learning as better than last spring, Latinx parents (61%), parents of fully remote learners (66%), and parents from low-income households (60%) are less likely to agree.
  • Academic concerns are a top tier issue. Fifty-nine percent of parents are very concerned about their child falling behind academically (86% total concerned). In addition, 54% are very concerned about ensuring that their child is ready for the next grade level (85% total concerned). Parents from low-income households (33%) are less likely than higher-income parents (38%) to think that their child’s overall educational experience has gotten better compared to traditional in-person classes. Families from low-income households are also less likely to think that the quality of teaching and instruction that their child is receiving has been better: only 27% of parents from low-income households say it is better now compared to before the pandemic, while 34% of higher-income parents say the same.
  • Many parents lack information on their child’s academic progress. Black parents, parents from low-income households, and parents of fully remote learners are most likely to say they have received little to no information on grade level expectations (26% Black parents, 33% parents from low-income households, 31% parents of fully remote learners) or “learning loss” (52% Black parents, 50% low-income households, 49% parents of remote learners) – more so than white parents (27% little to no information on grade level expectations, 44% little to no information on learning loss) and parents of in-person/hybrid learners (27%, 41%). Families from low-income households are also similarly impacted when it comes to lack of information (33% little to no information on grade level expectations, 50% little to no information on learning loss) compared to their wealthier counterparts (25%, 40%).

To view the poll and all of its data, you can click here.