wkbw_49278_Super7_658x90.png

Actions

20-year-old running for North Tonawanda School Board

North Tonawanda HS.jpg
Posted at 11:21 AM, Feb 18, 2019
and last updated 2019-02-18 17:57:24-05

Twenty-year-old Cody Braeges has announced that he is running for a seat on the North Tonawanda Board of Education.

Braeges calls North Tonawanda his hometown, and graduated from North Tonwanda High School in 2017.

He said he wanted to run for a seat on the school board because he wants to give students a voice, and bring to light bullying, mental health, and programs that he believes should be taught in school.

"I think we should be providing students with the best resources and the best programs and things to prepare them for the real world, and college and whatever career they want to get into.

A graduate of North Tonawanda High School himself, Braeges said aside from the basics he wishes there were classes to teach students about skills everyone needs in the real world.

"Even like how to do up a proper resume, and credit cards and loans - and that's like a whole sub-thing within itself," he said. "There's so many different types of loans, and you know, here we are at 17, 18 years old graduating high school. like these are crucial things that i think we should know about."

Another important focus for Braeges is the issues of bullying and mental health.

"A lot of people don't really talk about them, or don't feel comfortable talking about them. I believe they are things that need constant attention, and that need to be always addressed and always be spoken about," he said.

Two years ago, North Tonawanda took action to stop bullying by punishing the parents of bullies.

The state law allowed authorities to send parents of bullies to jail for up to 15 days, and fine them up to $250.

Before the law there was little police could do to stop bad behavior.

North Tonawanda police said there have been zero arrests since the law's implementation, but a number of parents did get warnings.

Braeges now attends Niagara County Community College where he studies Business Administration.

If elected, he said he will "act as a connection" between the community and the superintendent.

There are two seats up for election in may.