Children's to Add Special Needs Physician Courtesy Grant

October 17, 2012 Updated Oct 17, 2012 at 7:52 AM EDT

By WKBW News
By Business First by Tracey Drury

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October 17, 2012 Updated Oct 17, 2012 at 7:52 AM EDT

BUFFALO, NY (WKBW) - Women & Children's Hospital of Buffalo will hire a new physician and increase access to autism evaluation services with help from a new grant from the Children's Guild Foundation.

The $343,327 grant will be used to improve and meet patient demand for access to evaluation services at The Children's Guild Foundation Autism Spectrum Disorder Center and Robert Warner MD Center for Children with Special Needs, which is operated by the hospital.

Specifically, the hospital will use the funds in partnership with University Pediatric Associates to conduct a nationwide search to recruit a full-time attending developmental pediatrician to expand services and implement new and innovative approaches to care for children with special needs.

According to a media release from Women & Children's, the specialist will split his or her time equally between Autism Spectrum Disorder Center and the Robert Warner Center, as well as provide consultation to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) and work to enhance training and research activities.

The grant follows a $2 million grant award from the foundation to help fund the NICU within the new hospital planned on the Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus; as well as the $584,828 grant awarded earlier this year to create the autism disorder center. Both included naming rights. Additionally, the foundation has provided funding support to the Robert Warner Center for the past 60 years.

The Children's Guild Foundation Autism Spectrum Disorder Center is the region's only center for medically-based, multidisciplinary evaluation and diagnosis of children with autism spectrum disorders. The Robert Warner Center provides rehabilitation services to children with known or suspected disabilities.

Founded in 1910, foundation provides financial support through grant funding to nonprofit organizations working with children with special needs. It also funds research initiatives in the area of pediatric developmental disabilities.

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