Eighteen Mile Creek Added to EPA Superfund List, Hochul Says

March 13, 2012 Updated Mar 13, 2012 at 4:45 PM EDT

By WKBW News

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Eighteen Mile Creek Added to EPA Superfund List, Hochul Says

March 13, 2012 Updated Mar 13, 2012 at 4:45 PM EDT

Lockport, N.Y. (WKBW release) -- New York Congresswoman Kathy Hochul on Tuesday announced the Environmental Protection Agency has concluded its comment review process for the Eighteen Mile Creek Corridor and added the contaminated site to the EPA Superfund National Priorities List .

According to a news release from Hochul's office:

“This is great news for the people of Niagara County, who have waited nearly 25 years for the cleanup to begin at Eighteen Mile Creek,” said Congresswoman Hochul.  “For far too long, the people of Niagara County have had to deal with an immediate health risk that also hinders economic development in the region.  The addition of this site to the Superfund List will finally provide the EPA with the resources needed to finally form a plan for cleaning up the contamination.”

Hochul has been a strong backer of cleaning up the site – both writing letters and making calls to the EPA and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation constantly over the last 10 months.  Earlier this month, Congresswoman Hochul repeated her call for EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson to expedite the determination of inclusion of Eighteen Mile Creek on the EPA Superfund National Priorities List.  A copy of the letter can be found here.

Hochul added, “We could not have achieved this major accomplishment without the help of ordinary citizens, like Shirley Nicholas and Jean Kiene, who first brought this matter to my attention nearly a year ago.  I thank them, and all those who have fought tirelessly to clean up this site, for not giving up.”

Eighteen Mile Creek and surrounding properties have been the focus of numerous investigations by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) and the EPA since the late 1980s. In tests conducted by the NYSDEC, it was found that soil around the site and surrounding areas have been found to contain high levels of metals, as well as Polychlorinated Biphenyls, known to cause several hazardous health conditions in humans and wildlife.