Condoms in Schools?

February 25, 2013 Updated Feb 25, 2013 at 7:50 PM EDT

By Rachel Elzufon

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February 25, 2013 Updated Feb 25, 2013 at 7:50 PM EDT

Buffalo, NY (WKBW) - The sex-ed debate could go further than deciding between teaching abstinence or contraception.

One local school district is considering handing out condom's to high schoolers.

The Rochester School District has already started handing out condoms -- students there can get up to 10 a day for free.

Now Buffalo Public Schools are considering starting a similar program for high schoolers.

In a study released last September, more than half of Buffalo High Schoolers admitted to having sex.

Buffalo has a high teen pregnancy and STD rate. One zip code had more than 600 pregnant teenagers between 2008 and 2010.

The Buffalo Public High School Associate Superintendent calls Rochester's decision to hand out condoms "courageous." He says that is a possibility here in Buffalo.

Dr. Will Keresztes says "It's not enough just to provide access to contraception. We need to deliver high quality education as well and we need to experts to help guide us."

The Buffalo Common Council President says while something needs to be done, he is not sure handing out condoms inside school is the best idea.

Richard Fontana says "I think that sends the wrong message within the learning environment, I think if they work with community partners there maybe a way to go.

Keresztes says while they are not partnered with organizations right now, that is what teenagers rely on, and it is not working.

If Buffalo schools develop a plan to hand out condoms, Keresztes says the district would talk to families.

In Rochester, parents have the ability to sign an opt-out form, removing students from the program.

The Erie County Department of Health emphasizes that research shows if teens feel like they can talk to parents about these issues, they are less likely to contract an STD or get pregnant.

Viewers have been voicing their opinions online.

Duane writes "by handing out condoms, they are just encouraging the students to have sex."

Matthew says "kids are going to have sex no matter what. Why not give them condoms so that way they can be safe, and not end up with a child when most of them are still children themselves."

Dane wrote "schools should probably be passing out more books, pencils and calculators, instead of condoms."