Edwards Announces Seed Funding for SUNY Fredonia Incubator Tenant

September 27, 2013 Updated Apr 27, 2012 at 10:41 AM EDT

By WKBW News

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Edwards Announces Seed Funding for SUNY Fredonia Incubator Tenant

September 27, 2013 Updated Apr 27, 2012 at 10:41 AM EDT

Dunkirk, N.Y. (WKBW release) -- Chautauqua County Executive Gregory J. Edwards on Thursday announced approval of seed funding in the amount of $20,000 to Henlie, Inc., headquartered in the SUNY Fredonia Technology Incubator at 214 Central Avenue, Dunkirk. 

According to a news release:

Henlie, Inc. is a developer of social networking applications, mobile applications, and educational software.  Founded by Craig Rittling, President, the company recently wrapped up development of its first application called “PettyCourtTM” which will launch end of April.

PettyCourtTM is a first-of-its-kind social networking application that will launch simultaneously as a stand-alone website and also a Facebook application with exposure to approximately 170 million U.S. members.  PettyCourtTM will target various market segments including reality TV viewers, social network members, and online gamers. With the tagline “Resolve the debate… litigate- PettyCourt awaits,”

PettyCourtTM will provide an online solution for members to resolve disputes that are either too small in value or too trivial for small claims court.  PettyCourtTM  will fill the void between doing nothing and filing a lawsuit in small claims court.  Edwards congratulated Rittling on the product launch and thanked him for locating his corporate headquarters in Chautauqua County.

Edwards, who conceived the idea of the Chautauqua Seed Fund, said, "Since taking office six years ago, a key initiative of my administration has been fostering entrepreneurship and supporting small businesses in Chautauqua County.  Recognizing a gap in funding availability, we created the 'Chautauqua Seed Fund' to provide businesses located in the SUNY Fredonia Technology Incubator with greater access to capital during the time when they typically need it the most- the start-up stage."  Edwards went on to explain that funding small business growth and development can be challenging.  Often considered too new or too risky to qualify for traditional bank financing, entrepreneurial capital needs are also often too small to attract venture capital or, in some cases, even angel funding.  Seed funding can be used to bridge the gap.